KCG Research Seminar 2020

The purpose of the seminar is to provide a platform for presenting and discussing ongoing research on determinants and consequences of globalisation in general and global value chains in particular. The seminar will take place on an irregular basis at the Kiel Institute for the World Economy or at the Christian-Albrechts University of Kiel. Both are scientific partners of KCG. Information about upcoming presentations will be provided here in advance.

If you have any questions about the KCG Research Seminar, please contact Dr. Wan-Hsin Liu (KCG Coordinator).

 

 

KCG Lunch-Time Seminar 2020-7:

Topic: tba

Prof. Emily J. Blanchard, Ph.D. (Tuck School of Business)

Abstract: tba

Date: Friday, June 19, 2020, 12.00 – 13.00

Venue: Medienraum (A211), Kiel Institute for the World Economy (Kiellinie 66, 24105 Kiel)

 

KCG Research Seminar 2020-6:

Topic: tba

Prof. Lei Li, Ph.D. (University of Mannheim)

Abstract: tba

Date: Monday, May 4, 2020, 16:15 – 17:30

Venue: Lecture Hall (A032), Kiel Institute for the World Economy (Kiellinie 66, 24105 Kiel)

*It is also an Erich-Schneider Seminar of the Kiel University.

 

KCG Lunch-Time Seminar 2020-5:

Topic: tba

Clément Nedoncelle, Ph.D. (INRA, France)

Abstract: tba

Date: Friday, March 27, 2020, 12.00 – 13.00

Venue: Medienraum (A211), Kiel Institute for the World Economy (Kiellinie 66, 24105 Kiel)

 

KCG Lunch-Time Seminar 2020-4:

Topic: tba

Prof. Jordan James Norris, Ph.D. (Aarhus University)

Abstract: tba

Date: Friday, March 13, 2020, 12.00 – 13.00

Venue: Medienraum (A211), Kiel Institute for the World Economy (Kiellinie 66, 24105 Kiel)

 

KCG Lunch-Time Seminar 2020-3:

Topic: tba

Prof. Sarah Schroeder, Ph.D. (Aarhus University)

Abstract: tba

Date: Thursday, February 27, 2020, 12.00 – 13.00

Venue: Medienraum (A211), Kiel Institute for the World Economy (Kiellinie 66, 24105 Kiel)

 

KCG Lunch-Time Seminar 2020-2:

Why are Africa’s Female Entrepreneurs Unable to Play the Export Game?  Evidence from Ghana

Prof. Aoife Hanley, Ph.D. (CAU, IfW & KCG) & Cecília Hornok, Ph.D. (IfW & KCG)

Abstract: Using the Ghanaian ISSER-IGC panel, a survey of micro, small and medium-sized manufacturing enterprises for 2011-2015, we explore how the underperformance of Africa’s female entrepreneurs can be explained by a male-female export gap, together with nine key business constraints. We find that female entrepreneurs are less likely to export and optimize their exports than their male peers. Importantly, we find that although access to finance is ranked more highly as a constraint by female entrepreneurs, this does not explain the difficulties they experience in optimizing exports. Consistent with related work (Field et al, 2010; Swamy et al, 2001), we find that constraints related to social and cultural norms, in particular concerning bribes and security, are especially important for females. This may hint at the exclusion of female entrepreneurs (voluntarily or involuntarily) from business networks or practices favored by their male peers.

Date: Friday, February 14, 2020, 12.00 – 13.00

Venue: Medienraum (A211), Kiel Institute for the World Economy (Kiellinie 66, 24105 Kiel)

 

KCG Lunch-Time Seminar 2020-1:

Death to the Cobb-Douglas Production Function

Prof. Tomas Havranek, Ph.D. (Charles University, Prague)

Abstract: We show that the large elasticity of substitution between capital and labour estimated in the literature on average, 0.9, can be explained by three factors: publication bias, use of aggregated data, and omission of the first-order condition for capital. The mean elasticity conditional on the absence of publication bias, disaggregated data, and inclusion of information from the first-order condition for capital is 0.3. To obtain this result, we collect 3,186 estimates of the elasticity reported in 121 studies, codify 71 variables that reflect the context in which researchers produce their estimates, and address model uncertainty by Bayesian and frequentist model averaging. We employ nonlinear techniques to correct for publication bias, which is responsible for at least half of the overall reduction in the mean elasticity from 0.9 to 0.3. The weight of evidence accumulated in the empirical literature emphatically rejects the Cobb-Douglas specification.

Date: Friday, January 17, 2020, 12.00 – 13.00

Venue: Medienraum (A211), Kiel Institute for the World Economy (Kiellinie 66, 24105 Kiel)